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Pygeum africanum

There are 1 good studies at Pygeum africanum . Here's a selection:
Abstracts with Pygeum africanum Research:

2009
Pygeum africanum may suppress the oxidative stress in diabetic bladder and may slow the process of diabetic cystopathy.
Abstract Title:
Pygeum africanum: effect on oxidative stress in early diabetes-induced bladder.
Abstract Source:
Int Urol Nephrol. 2009 Jul 16. PMID: 19609708
Abstract Author(s):
Dan Wang, Yongzhi Li, Guihua Hou, Ping Wang, Jianping Zhang, Vincent Laudon, Benkang Shi
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of Pygeum africanum on oxidative stress and functional changes of the bladder after diabetes induction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-two adult Wistar male rats were treated daily for 8 weeks and grouped as follows: Control group (n = 6), Streptozotocin-induced diabetic group (n = 10), diabetes plus P. africanum group (n = 10), and control plus P. africanum group (n = 6). After diabetes induction for 4 weeks, the diabetes plus P. africanum and control plus P. africanum groups were fed with P. africanum (100 mg/kg, orally) in peanut oil for another 4 weeks. The catalase, superoxide dismutase activity, and malondialdehyde levels were measured as a marker of lipid peroxidation. The levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase were also evaluated. Urodynamic studies were performed to evaluate the functional changes of diabetic bladders after P. africanum treatment. RESULTS: The catalase and superoxide dismutase activities significantly increased (P < 0.05) and maleic dialdehyde levels significantly decreased from diabetic plus P. africanum group compared with diabetic group (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical studies showed a significantly decreased number of inducible nitric oxide synthase-positive cells in diabetic plus P. africanum group compared with diabetic group (P < 0.05). In diabetic plus P. africanum group, maximal bladder volume significantly decreased, while bladder pressure and maximal bladder pressure significantly increased compared with diabetic group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Early treatment with P. africanum could effectively suppress the oxidative stress status in diabetic bladder and may slow down the process of diabetic cystopathy.
Article Published Date : Jul 16, 2009
Study Type : Animal Study
Additional Links
Substances : Pygeum Bark : CK(15) : AC(5)
Diseases : Diabetic: Bladder Dysfunction : CK(2) : AC(1), Diabetic Cystopathy : CK(2) : AC(1)
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2008
A compound isolated from Pygeum Bark has anti-androgenic actions which may be useful in the treatment of prostate cancer cell growth.
Abstract Title:
The natural compound atraric acid is an antagonist of the human androgen receptor inhibiting cellular invasiveness and prostate cancer cell growth.
Abstract Source:
J Cell Mol Med. 2008 Jul 4. PMID: 18627423
Abstract Author(s):
Maria Papaioannou, Sonja Schleich, Ina Prade, Stephanie Degen, Daniela Roell, Undine Schubert, Tamzin Tanner, Frank Claessens, Rudolf Matusch, Aria Baniahmad
Abstract:
Extracts from Pygeum africanum are used in the treatment of prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), major health problems of men in Western countries. The ligand-activated human androgen receptor (AR) supports the growth of the prostate gland. Inhibition of human AR by androgen ablation therapy and by applying synthetic antiandrogens is therefore the primary goal in treatment of patients. Here, we show that atraric acid (AA) isolated from bark material of Pygeum africanum has antiandrogenic activity, inhibiting the transactivation mediated by the ligand-activated human AR. This androgen antagonistic activity is receptor specific and does not inhibit the closely related glucocorticoid or progesterone receptors. Mechanistically, AA inhibits nuclear transport of AR. Importantly, AA is able to efficiently repress the growth of both the androgen-dependent LNCaP and also the androgen-independent C4-2 prostate cancer cells but not that of PC3 or CV1 cells lacking AR. In line with this, AA inhibits the expression of the endogenous prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene in both LNCaP und C4-2 cells. Analyses of cell invasion revealed that AA inhibits the invasiveness of LNCaP cells through extracellular matrix. Thus, this study provides a molecular insight for AA as a natural anti-androgenic compound and may serve as a basis for AA derivatives as a new chemical lead structure for novel therapeutic compounds as AR antagonists, that can be used for prophylaxis or treatment of prostatic diseases.
Article Published Date : Jul 04, 2008
Study Type : Animal Study
Additional Links
Substances : Pygeum Bark : CK(15) : AC(5)
Diseases : Prostate Cancer : CK(1586) : AC(463)
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1998

Pygeum Africanum reduces prostatic hyperplasia effectively and safely. - Article 1
Abstract Title:
Efficacy and acceptability of tadenan (Pygeum africanum extract) in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): a multicentre trial in central Europe.
Abstract Source:
Curr Med Res Opin. 1998;14(3):127-39. PMID: 9787978
Abstract Author(s):
J Breza, O Dzurny, A Borowka, T Hanus, R Petrik, G Blane, H Chadha-Boreham
Abstract:
Pygeum africanum extract is available as Tadenan in many countries, including those in central and eastern Europe, for the treatment of mild to moderate BPH. Its efficacy and acceptability have been demonstrated in numerous open and placebo-controlled studies in large populations. The present open three-centre efficacy and safety study was conducted according to common protocol at urology clinics in the Czech and Slovak Republics and in Poland, in order to confirm the therapeutic profile of Pygeum africanum in conditions of daily practice, using International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and flowmetry assessments. Men aged 50-75 years and in compliance with the selection criteria (including IPSS > or = 12, quality of life (QoL) score > or = 3, and maximum urinary flow < or = 15 ml/s) were first examined then recalled after two weeks during which no treatment was provided (washout and check of stability). If still compliant, they were entered at this point into a two-month period of treatment with Pygeum africanum extract 50 mg twice daily. There followed a further one-month period without treatment, the objective being to evaluate the persistence of any effects observed during the previous two months of Pygeum africanum administration. The primary efficacy parameter investigated was IPSS; the other efficacy parameters were QoL, nocturnal frequency, maximum urinary flow, average urinary flow, post-voiding residual volume and prostatic volume, after one and two months of Pygeum africanum treatment and one month after stopping treatment. A total of 85 patients were evenly distributed between the three centres and completed the entire study. At inclusion their mean IPSS was 16.17, QoL was 3.60 and nocturia was 2.6 times per night. The changes in subjective scores, IPSS and QoL after the two-month treatment period were highly statistically significant with mean improvements of 40% and 31%, respectively. Nocturnal frequency was reduced by 32% and the mean reduction was again highly statistically significant. Mean maximum urinary flow, average urinary flow and urine volume were also statistically significantly improved, but the modest improvement in post-voiding volume did not reach statistical significance. The improvements, which exceeded those observed with placebo in earlier studies, were maintained after one month without treatment indicating an interesting persistence of clinically useful activity. Prostatic volume and quality of sexual life remained unchanged throughout. No treatment-related adverse effects were observed. In conclusion, under conditions of daily practice, Pygeum africanum extract induces significant improvement in IPSS and uroflowmetry parameters. These positive effects are accompanied by a very satisfactory safety profile with the overall result of a substantial improvement in QoL.
Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1998
Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links
Substances : Pygeum Bark : CK(15) : AC(5)
Diseases : Nocturia : CK(42) : AC(5), Prostatic Hyperplasia: Benign : CK(256) : AC(59), Urination Disorders : CK(10) : AC(1)

More links:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Pygeum+africanum
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/search/google-cse#gsc.q=Pygeum%20africanum





Pygeum africanum
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PubMed
PubMed comprises more than 28 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. 
In PubMed
There are  124 on Pygeum africanum.
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In this study, compounds from the leaves and bark of this plant were isolated and tested for their cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction in two human cancer cell lines (hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) and colorectal carcinoma (Caco-2)) and a non-cancer cell line (embryonic kidney (HEK293)). GC-MS profiling of the extract was also conducted.
Pygeum africanum: effect on oxidative stress in early diabetes-induced bladder
Medicinal plants used in traditional medicine by Oromo people, Ghimbi District, Southwest Ethiopia
Species of the genus Coniochaeta (anamorph: Lecythophora) are known as pathogens of woody hosts, but can also cause opportunistic human infections. Several fungi with conidial stages resembling Lecythophora were isolated from necrotic wood samples of Prunus trees in South Africa. In order to reveal their phylogenetic relationships, these fungi were studied on a morphological and molecular (5.8S nrDNA, ITS-1, ITS-2, GAPDH, EF-1alpha, 28S nrDNA, 18S nrDNA) basis.
Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of the herbal agent Pygeum africanum on cultured prostate stromal cells from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)
A Negative Finding from a Single Center Study Led to Re-Design of a Large-Scale Clinical Trial of Phytotherapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: the CAMUS study. From Pygeum bark.
The Failed Medical Experiment: PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer

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