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Public studies on ingredients:
Animal Study, Bacterial, Human In Vitro, Human Study, In Vitro Study.

Research & Studies:
Fucoidan/Seaweed -

"Do not tell everything. You can be stopped. Truth is not in everyone's interest."

Fucoidan, SeaWeed

There are 167 good studies at Fucoidan. Here's a selection:
Abstracts with Fucoidan Research

2011
"Fucoidan reduces the toxicities of chemotherapy for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer."


Abstract Title:
Fucoidan reduces the toxicities of chemotherapy for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer.
Abstract Source:
Oncol Lett. 2011 Mar ;2(2):319-322. Epub 2011 Jan 21. PMID: 22866084
Abstract Author(s):
Masahide Ikeguchi, Manabu Yamamoto, Yosuke Arai, Yoshihiko Maeta, Keigo Ashida, Kuniyuki Katano, Yasunari Miki, Takayuki Kimura
Article Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8504.
Abstract:
Combination chemotherapy with oxaliplatin plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (FOLFOX) or irinotecan plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (FOLFIRI) has become a standard regimen for advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. Numerous studies have reported that long-term use of FOLFOX or FOLFIRI leads to better survival for these patients. Thus, control of the toxicity of these drugs may be crucial to prolonging survival. Fucoidan is one of the major sulfated polysaccharides of brown seaweeds and exhibits a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of fucoidan on suppressing the toxicity of anti-cancer drugs. A total of 20 patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer scheduled to undergo treatment with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI were randomly allocated into a fucoidan treatment group (n=10) and a control group without fucoidan treatment (n=10). Results showed that fucoidan regulated the occurrence of fatigue during chemotherapy. Chemotherapy with fucoidan was continued for a longer period than chemotherapy without fucoidan. Additionally, the survival of patients with fucoidan treatment was longer than that of patients without fucoidan, although the difference was not significant. Thus, fucoidan may enable the continuous administration of chemotherapeutic drugs for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer, and as a result, the prognosis of such patients is prolonged.
Article Published Date : Feb 28, 2011
Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links
Substances : Fucoidan : CK(236) : AC(122)
Diseases : Colorectal Adenomas : CK(20) : AC(2)
Pharmacological Actions : Chemosensitizer : CK(394) : AC(286)
Additional Keywords : Natural Substance/Drug Synergy : CK(352) : AC(142)

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2012
Beneficial effects of fucoidan in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

Abstract Title:
Beneficial effects of fucoidan in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.
Abstract Source:
World J Gastroenterol. 2012 May 14 ;18(18):2225-30. PMID: 22611316
Abstract Author(s):
Naoki Mori, Kazunori Nakasone, Koh Tomimori, Chie Ishikawa
Article Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology and Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215, Japan. naokimori50@gmail.com
Abstract:
AIM: To evaluate the effects of fucoidan, a complex sulfated polysaccharide extract from marine seaweed, on hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA load both in vitro and in vivo.
METHODS: HCV-1b replicon-expressing cells were cultured in the presence of fucoidan obtained from Cladosiphon okamuranus Tokida cultivated in Okinawa, Japan, and quantified the level of HCV replication. In an open-label uncontrolled study, 15 patients with chronic hepatitis C, and HCV-related cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were treated with fucoidan (0.83 g/d) for 12 mo. The clinical symptoms, biochemical tests, and HCV RNA levels were assessed before, during, and after treatment.
RESULTS: Fucoidan dose-dependently inhibited the expression of HCV replicon. At 8-10 mo of treatment with fucoidan, HCV RNA levels were significantly lower relative to the baseline. The same treatment also tended to lower serum alanine aminotransferase levels, and the latter correlated with HCV RNA levels. However, the improved laboratory tests did not translate into significant clinical improvement. Fucoidan had no serious adverse effects.
CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that fucoidan is safe and useful in the treatment of patients with HCV-related chronic liver diseases. Further controlled clinical trials are needed to confirm the present findings.
Article Published Date : May 13, 2012
Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links
Substances : Fucoidan : CK(236) : AC(122)
Diseases : Liver Cancer : CK(1235) : AC(462), Liver Cirrhosis : CK(395) : AC(56)
Pharmacological Actions : Antiviral Agents : CK(938) : AC(433)

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2017
Low-molecular-weight fucoidan combined with chemotarget agents significantly improved the disease control rate.

Abstract Title:
Efficacy of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan as a Supplemental Therapy in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.
Abstract Source:
Mar Drugs. 2017 Apr 21 ;15(4). Epub 2017 Apr 21. PMID: 28430159
Abstract Author(s):
Hsiang-Lin Tsai, Chi-Jung Tai, Ching-Wen Huang, Fang-Rong Chang, Jaw-Yuan Wang
Article Affiliation:
Hsiang-Lin Tsai
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF) is widely used as a food supplement for cancer patients. However, all of the studies are in vitro or were conducted using mice. Therefore, powerful clinical evidence for LMF use is relatively weak. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LMF as a supplemental therapy to chemo-target agents in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients.
METHODS: We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of LMF as a supplemental therapy to chemotarget agents in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Sixty eligible patients with mCRC were included. Finally, 54 patients were enrolled, of whom 28 were included in the study group and 26 in the control group. The primary endpoint was the disease control rate (DCR), and secondary endpoints included the overall response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), adverse effects (AEs), and quality of life (QOL).
RESULTS: The DCRs were 92.8% and 69.2% in the study and control groups, respectively (p = 0.026), in a median follow-up period of 11.5 months. The OS, PFS, ORR, AEs, and QOL did not significantly differ between the two groups.
CONCLUSION: This is the first clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of LMF as a supplemental therapy in the management of patients with mCRC. The results indicate that LMF combined with chemotarget agents significantly improved the DCR.
Article Published Date : Apr 20, 2017
Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links
Substances : Fucoidan : CK(236) : AC(122)
Diseases : Colorectal Cancer : CK(1646) : AC(619)
Pharmacological Actions : Chemotherapeutic : CK(397) : AC(152)
Additional Keywords : Chemotherapeutic, COLORECTAL CANCER, Fucoidan

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2018
Early use of fucoidan in diabetic individuals may minimize damage to testicular tissue.

Abstract Title:
Effects of fucoidan on diabetic rat testicular tissue.
Abstract Source:
Biotech Histochem. 2018 Mar 7:1-9. Epub 2018 Mar 7. PMID: 29513110
Abstract Author(s):
O Ersoy, G Kizilay
Article Affiliation:
O Ersoy
Abstract:
Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting from hyperglycemia and inadequate endogenous antioxidant systems are responsible for the complications of diabetes. ROS accumulate in the cell and stimulate apoptosis, which compromises sperm quality and function. We investigated the possible effects of fucoidan, a potent antioxidant with a regulatory effect on blood glucose homeostasis, on the testicular tissues of rats with experimental diabetes. Diabetes was induced by administering 40 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) on five consecutive days. Twenty-four Wistar albino male rats were divided into four groups: group 1, control group (CG); group 2, diabetes group (DG); group 3, early fucoidan group (EFG) treated with 50 mg/kg fucoidan after diabetes induction; group 4, late fucoidan group (LFG) treated with the same dose of fucoidan 15 days after diabetes induction. Fucoidan was administered intraperitoneally every two days for four weeks. Basement membrane thickness and Johnsen scores were higher in the DG than in the CG; no difference was found for either the EFG or LFG compared to the CG. Seminiferous tubule diameters of EFG were significantly greater than for the DG. Apoptotic tubule and apoptotic cell indexes were significantly greater in the DG and significantly less in the EFG and LFG groups compared to the CG. Early use of fucoidan in diabetic individuals may minimize damage to testicular tissue.
Article Published Date : Mar 06, 2018
Study Type : Animal Study
Additional Links
Substances : Fucoidan : CK(236) : AC(122)
Diseases : Diabetic Complications : CK(1563) : AC(333)
Pharmacological Actions : Anti-Apoptotic : CK(384) : AC(212)
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2017

Fucoidan could be a potential medical adjunctive therapy for small abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Abstract Title:
Fucoidan attenuates angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms through the inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and nuclear factorκB activation.
Abstract Source:
J Vasc Surg. 2017 Dec 28. Epub 2017 Dec 28. PMID: 29290496
Abstract Author(s):
Shih-Hung Tsai, Jen-Chun Wang, Wen-I Liao, Yu-Juei Hsu, Chih-Yuan Lin, Min-Tser Liao, Po-Hsun Huang, Shing-Jong Lin
Article Affiliation:
Shih-Hung Tsai
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is one of the leading causes of sudden death among the elderly. Most incidental AAAs are below the threshold for intervention at the time of detection; however, there is no evidence that commonly used cardiovascular drugs have clinical beneficial effects on AAA progression. Therefore, in addition to current cardiovascular risk-reducing treatments, an adjunctive medical therapy targeting the regulation of extracellular matrix metabolism is still required in the clinical setting. Fucoidan is an extract of brown seaweed and a sulfated polysaccharide. Emerging evidence suggests that fucoidan has potential cardiovascular applications. Numerous investigations of fucoidan in diseases of the cardiovascular system have mainly focused on its pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects. Specifically, fucoidan has been shown to have matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-reducing effects in several studies. We aimed to evaluate the beneficial effect of fucoidan on aneurysmal growth in a murine model of aortic aneurysm and further provide a rationale for using fucoidan as a medical adjunctive therapy.
METHODS: A murine model of angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced AAA was used to assess the therapeutic effects of fucoidan on AAA growth in vivo. The characteristics and quantification of AAAs were determined in situ. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were used for studying the involved pathways in vitro. Western blotting was used to detect the involved signaling pathways both in vivo and in vitro.
RESULTS: Treatment with fucoidan significantly reduced the incidence of AAA formation. Administration of fucoidan significantly attenuated Ang II-induced aortic expansion from 1.56 ± 0.76 mm to 1.09 ± 0.30 mm. Administration of fucoidan significantly suppressed MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and reduced the grade of elastin degradation in vivo. In vitro, we found that fucoidan could ameliorate the Ang II-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and nuclear factor κB p65, and it further reduced MMP and reactive oxygen species production.
CONCLUSIONS: Fucoidan inhibits the progression of experimental AAA growth through the attenuation of proinflammatory nuclear factorκB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation. Fucoidan could be a potential medical adjunctive therapy for small AAAs.
Article Published Date : Dec 27, 2017
Study Type : Animal Study
Additional Links
Substances : Fucoidan : CK(236) : AC(122)
Diseases : Aortic Aneurysm : CK(52) : AC(6)
Pharmacological Actions : Anti-Inflammatory Agents : CK(4861) : AC(1630), NF-kappaB Inhibitor : CK(1114) : AC(694)

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2015
Fucoidan may stimulate insulin secretion and provide pancreatic protection via the cAMP signaling pathway, in vivo and in vitro.​​​​​​​

Abstract Title:
Effects of fucoidan on insulin stimulation and pancreatic protection via the cAMP signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro.
Abstract Source:
Mol Med Rep. 2015 Sep ;12(3):4501-7. Epub 2015 Jun 23. PMID: 26130492
Abstract Author(s):
Xiaoming Jiang, Jinfeng Yu, Zhi Ma, Hong Zhang, Fengjie Xie
Article Affiliation:
Xiaoming Jiang
Abstract:
Diabetes is a global disease, in which pancreatic dysfunction is an important pathological process. In previous years, interest in the biological activities of seaweed has increased. Fucoidan is an extract of the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus, which has been widely investigated. The present study aimed to determine the effects of fucoidan on insulin stimulation and pancreatic protection in vivo and in vitro. Goto‑Kakizaki (GK) rats were provided with free access to standard food, with or without fucoidan, for 13 weeks,following which the body weights, and blood glucose and serum insulin levels of the rats were measured. Wistar rats were used as a control. In addition, the RIN‑5F rat insulin‑secreting cell line was treated with fucoidan in high glucose conditions, following which the dose‑dependent and time‑dependent effects of fucoidan were determined, and the concentration of insulin was measured. Glybenclamide was used as a positive control. In vivo, the body weight and serum insulin levels decreased, whereas blood glucose levels increased significantly in the GK rats, compared with the Wistar control rats. Although, fucoidan did not improve changes in body weight, the increased blood glucose levels were reduced and the decreased serum insulin levels were increased in the GK rats following oral administration of fucoidan. In vitro, fucoidan did not exhibit significant cytotoxicity towardsthe RIN‑5F cells, and the insulin secretion increased significantly in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Treatment with amylin, an islet amyloid polypeptide and glybenclamide inhibitor, did not inhibit the stimulatory activity of fucoidan. The results of the present study also demonstrated that the concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was significantly increased in the fucoidan‑treated RIN‑5F cells, and this increase was dose‑ and time‑dependent. In addition, treatment with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, which decreases the degradation of cAMP, significantly increased fucoidan‑induced insulin secretion, whereas treatment with an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, which decreases the generation of cAMP, significantly decreased fucoidan‑induced insulin secretion. In conclusion, these data indicated that fucoidan may stimulate insulin secretion and provide pancreatic protection via the cAMP signaling pathway, in vivo and in vitro.
Article Published Date : Aug 31, 2015
Study Type : Animal Study, In Vitro Study
Additional Links
Substances : Fucoidan : CK(236) : AC(122)
Diseases : Pancreatic Diseases : CK(21) : AC(8)
Pharmacological Actions : Insulin-releasing : CK(62) : AC(28), Pancreato Protective Agents : CK(40) : AC(23)
Additional Keywords : Dose Response : CK(1519) : AC(574)
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You will find much more in the following links on the fucoidan:

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http://www.greenmedinfo.com/substance/fucoidan  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=fucoidan
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=seaweed
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=fucus+vesiculosus

Proposed mechanism for fucoidan bioactivity (A) Macrophage activation by fucoidans as mediated through specific membrane receptor activation namely TLR-4, CD14, CR-3 and SR which induces intracellular signaling via mitogen-activation protein kinases (MAPKs); (B) Activation of macrophages leads to the production of cytokines such as IL-12, IL-2 and IFN-γ which enhance NK cell activation that may stimulate T-cell activation
Proposed mechanism for fucoidan bioactivity (A) Macrophage activation by fucoidans as mediated through specific membrane receptor activation namely TLR-4, CD14, CR-3 and SR which induces intracellular signaling via mitogen-activation protein kinases (MAPKs); (B) Activation of macrophages leads to the production of cytokines such as IL-12, IL-2 and IFN-γ which enhance NK cell activation that may stimulate T-cell activation





SeaWeed-Fucus vesiculosus
_______________________
PubMed
PubMed comprises more than 28 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. 
In PubMed
There are  4689 on SeaWeed.
There are 808 on Fucus vesiculosus.
There are 1619 on Fucoidan.

_______________________

109 Diseases Researched for Fucoidan
Liver Cancer415
Liver Cirrhosis314
Atopic Dermatitis212
Colorectal Adenomas110
Colorectal Cancer110
T-lymphotropic virus type-1 Infection: Human110
Breast Cancer56
Cancers: All56
Colon Cancer56
Diabetes Mellitus: Type 236
Thrombosis46
Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toxicity55
Lung Cancer45
Oxidative Stress45
Radiation Induced Illness35
Aspirin-Induced Toxicity24
Atherosclerosis24
Hyperlipidemia24
Inflammation34
Myocardial Infarction24
Obesity34
Bladder Cancer23
Brain: Microglial Activation33
Neurodegenerative Diseases33
Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Toxicity12
Aortic Plaques12
Arteriosclerosis12
Bone Destructive Diseases: Over-Active Osteoclasts12
Bone Fractures12
Cachexia: Chemotherapy Induced12
Cartilage Diseases12
Cartilage Injury12
Cerebral Ischemia12
Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicity: Cisplatin12
Cytomegalovirus Infections12
Depression: Restraint Stress Related12
Diabetic Nephropathy12
Dopamine Deficiency12
Drug-Induced Toxicity: Gastrointestinal12
Dyslipidemias12
Electric Injuries12
Electrical Burn Injury12
Endothelial Dysfunction12
Endotoxemia12
Gastric Cancer22
Gastric Ulcer12
HSV-112
HSV-212
Heart Disease: Ischemic22
Hip Fracture12
Hyperglycemia12
Immune Dysregulation: TH1/TH2 imbalance12
Inflammation: Brain12
Inflammation: Neutrophil-Mediated12
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases12
Intima Media Thickening12
Ischemia22
Ischemic Heart Disease22
Leukemia: Acute promyelocytic leukemia12
Lipid Peroxidation12
Liver Fibrosis12
Liver Injury: Ischemia/reperfusion12
Malaria12
Melanoma22
Multiple Myeloma12
Multiple Sclerosis12
Myocardial Infarction: Prevention12
Myocardial Ischemia12
Myocarditis: Autoimmune12
Organ Transplantation: Aorta12
Osteoarthritis12
Osteoporosis12
Pancreatic Diseases12
Parkinson's Disease12
Prostate Cancer12
Restenosis12
Surgical Adhseions12
Ulcerative Colitis12
Vibrio Alginolyticus Infection12
Weight Problems22
Avian Influenza11
Brain Inflammation11
Cervical Cancer11
Clotting11
Colon Cancer: Prevention11
Dengue11
Diesel Exhaust Particle Toxicity11
Dysbiosis11
Glioma11
HIV Infections11
Hair Loss: Drug-Induced11
Helicobacter Pylori Infection11
Hepatoma11
Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Toxicity11
Ischemia: Myocardial11
Leishmaniasis11
Low Immune Function: Natural Killer Cells11
Lung Cancer: Metastatic11
Neomycin Toxicity11
Newcastle Disease Virus11
Parainfluenza Virus Infections11
Parkinsonian Disorders11
Pigmentation Disorders11
Promyelocytic leukemia11
Sarcomas11
Skin Cancer11
Thyroid Cancer11
Tumors11
Wound Healing: Delayed


76 Pharmacological Actions Researched for Fucoidan
Anti-Inflammatory Agents1421
Apoptotic1820
Antiviral Agents819
Antineoplastic Agents1315
Antiproliferative1013
Chemotherapeutic212
Antioxidants811
Cardioprotective510
Chemosensitizer110
Interleukin-4 downregulation110
Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Alpha Inhibitor610
NF-kappaB Inhibitor79
Anti-Angiogenic38
Neuroprotective Agents68
Anti-metastatic56
Interleukin-1 beta downregulation46
Anti-Tumor35
Chemopreventive35
Radioprotective35
Angiogenesis Inhibitors34
Anti-Adipogenic34
Cell cycle arrest44
Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors34
Hepatoprotective24
Hypoglycemic Agents24
Interleukin-6 Downregulation24
Malondialdehyde Down-regulation24
Pancreato Protective Agents24
Thrombolytic24
Immunomodulatory23
Superoxide Dismutase Up-regulation23
Anti-Bacterial Agents22
Anti-Cachexic Agents12
Anti-Ulcer Agents12
Anti-atherogenic12
Antidepressive Agents12
Antiparasitic Agents12
Bax/Bcl2 Ratio: Decrease12
Bcl-2 protein down-regulation22
Caspase-8 activation22
Cyclooxygenase 1 Inhibitor12
Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor12
Hypolipidemic12
Immunomodulatory: Innate Immunity Up-Regulation12
Insulin-releasing12
Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) inhibitor12
Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) inhibitor12
Neutrophil Activation: Down-Regulation12
Neutrophil Rolling Inhibitor12
Osteogenic12
Renoprotective12
Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Alpha Enhancer12
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A Inhibitor12
Angiogenesis Inducing Agents11
Anti-Apoptotic11
Anti-HIV Agents11
Anti-Infective Agents11
Anti-Platelet11
Anti-thrombotic11
Anticarcinogenic Agents11
Anticoagulants11
Antifungal Agents11
Autophagy Up-regulation11
Caspase-3 Activation11
Cytotoxic11
Enzyme Inhibitors11
Gastrointestinal Agents11
Heme oxygenase-1 up-regulation11
Immunostimulatory11
Leishmanicidal11
Lipolytic11
Matrix Metalloproteinases Inhibitors11
Nitric Oxide Inhibitor11
Nrf2 activation11
Telomerase Inhibitor11
Tyrosinase inhibitors11

Seaweeds are divided into three main groupings based largely on their pigmentation. The groupings are brown seaweeds, the red seaweeds and the green seaweeds.
Seaweeds are divided into three main groupings based largely on their pigmentation. The groupings are brown seaweeds, the red seaweeds and the green seaweeds.

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